Cutting edge conservation helps wildlife

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The Softrack, a new-state-of-the-art cutting machine, is helping the RSPB to give wildlife a home in Blackloftands, the largest tidal reed bed in England.

The light and agile vehicle that is able to cut reed quickly and efficiently and can easily access the wettest areas at the heart of the reedbed. This means the RSPB is able manage the site more effectively, by creating open areas across the reedbed that benefit a huge range of wildlife including rare bitterns, bearded tits and water voles.

Pete Short, Humber Reserves Manager, says: “In the past we used a tractor with hay mower to cut the reed but the weight of the vehicle meant that it sank in the wetter parts of the reserve. This meant we had to resort to using a heavy-duty strimmer called a brush cutter, which was hard physical work and pretty miserable as we used to get very wet and cold.

“With its caterpillar rollers and lightweight design, the Softrack can get anywhere in the reedbed and cut about four times as much reed as a team of three people using brush cutters. It is saving us a lot of time, money and energy.”

As well as benefitting plants and animals, the RSPB also plans to use the Softrack to harvest reed for use as a low carbon fuel. Funded by landfill tax charity WREN, the Softrack is part of Back to the Future, a five-year RSPB project that will restore wetlands to their former glory and manage them sustainably for wildlife through modern conservation techniques.

Over the past few centuries, large areas of the Humberhead Levels’ important wetlands have been lost due to drainage schemes, which have had a devastating effect on wildlife.

4 responses to “Cutting edge conservation helps wildlife

  1. Sounds a great innovation – thanks for the news about it. RH

  2. Our ability to understand better the natural habitat of the reedbed has led to one of the best stories in nature conservation, the re-emergence of reedbed all over this country. I can remember the time when to see wintering Bitterns you had to travel to NW England. Now they are in a reed bed not 6 miles from the centre of London.

  3. Reblogged this on Pete's Favourite Things and commented:
    Our ability to understand better the natural habitat of the reedbed has led to one of the best stories in nature conservation, the re-emergence of reedbed all over this country. I can remember the time when to see wintering Bitterns you had to travel to NW England. Now they are in a reed bed not 6 miles from the centre of London.

  4. Hi Tim, I’m playing catch up with all things blogging again. Thanks for this post, I do love these innovations. Modern-day conservation certainly needs to be innovative if we are to provide a better world for our threatened species in this ever-changing world.

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