Category Archives: Green

Tips for a Green New Year

It’s far from comprehensive, but here’s a link to some New Year’s tips for lightening our footprint on our precious planet:

Tips for a Green New Year | Easy Ideas for Organizing and Cleaning Your Home | HGTV.Happy-New-Year-2015-Beautiful-Green

Merry Christmas

London march for global action on climate change

b76eed91-8a3e-4407-b1dd-d16bb18cdbe5-620x463

Campaigners marched through central London on Sunday to demand global action on climate change, in one of thousands of events worldwide ahead of a UN climate summit.

Some 2,000 events took place in 150 countries, with more than 100,000 people taking to the streets of New York – where the summit is being held – to demand leaders take action to tackle rising temperatures. The summit has been convened by the UN secretary general, Ban Ki-moon, in a bid to drive action and momentum towards talks in Paris in 2015, where it is hoped a new global climate treaty can be agreed.

In London, campaigners were joined by celebrities, including actress Emma Thompson and musician Peter Gabriel, and church bells rang to mark the march through Westminster to Parliament, where speeches and a rally were held.

Thompson said: “There is little time left to prevent the worst excesses of climate change, yet our world leaders continue to stall. I’ve witnessed the impact climate change is already having on the melting Arctic and on poverty-stricken communities in the developing world. We can’t go on pretending nothing’s happening.”

In a statement on his website, Peter Gabriel said: “This big blue ball is the only possible home for humanity in the near future. If our family home was being destroyed and poisoned in the same way, we would do something immediately.

“This is not just a campaign for activists, but for everyone who wants to live on a planet capable of sustaining us. We will only achieve a sustainable future if global citizens demand global action.”

Green Film Festival tours the UK

Image

A still from The Last Catch. Pic: UK Green Film Festival

The UK Green Film Festival 2014 celebrates seven powerful environmental films that will tour the country from 1-8 June.

This year’s line-up includes international award-winning films, and explores some of today’s big environmental issues. The films will be screened in 17 venues in 15 cities across the UK, including Clapham, Greenwich and Hackney Picturehouses.

Seven feature length documentaries – including several UK premieres – from all over the world will be presented at the festival, all of which will be preceded by an accompanying short film. These include:

  • The Last Catch. A study of the tuna industry’s impact on both the fish and those who catch them.
  • Lost Rivers. An exploration of the subterranean network of rivers beneath London, Montreal, Toronto and Brescia that house the secrets of each city’s past.
  • A River Changes Course. Winner of the Grand Jury Prize for Best Documentary at Sundance 2013, chronicles the influence of rapid urbanisation on three families in Cambodia.

“Our aim is simple,” said the festival’s co-founder, John Long. “We want to help people understand their impact on the environment, and what they can do to reduce it. Film has the power to do that; to provoke thought, to inspire, and to entertain. That’s what the UK Green Film Festival is all about.” 

Thousands of bird species live in cities

Dear Kitty. Some blog

This video from England says about itself:

London’s Birds

1) Black-headed Gulls, Moorhen, Tufted Duck and Mute Swans on Hampstead Heath pond. 2) Blue Tit singing in a Finchley Park. 3) Great Tits and a Blue Tit on a bird feeder in Hampstead Heath. 4) Moorhen on a frozen pond and Coot eating grass in Hampstead Heath. 5) Robin feeding on the edge of a Brook near Finchley. 5) Robin singing in a Tree in a garden in Finchley. 6) Great Tit singing in London. 7) Robin singing in Dollis Brook Greenway, Whetstone. 8) Robin singing in London.

From the All About Birds Blog in the USA:

Not Just Sparrows and Pigeons: Cities Harbor 20 Percent of World’s Bird Species

Tuesday, April 29th, 2014

By Andrea Alfano

Rock Pigeons, House Sparrows, and European Starlings are widely known as “city birds,” and with good reason. These three species…

View original post 894 more words

Big Garden Birdwatch results

Image

Pic: RSPCA

Almost half a million people took part in this year’s RSPB Big Garden Birdwatch and discovered some interesting changes among our most popular garden birds, with some species creeping up the rankings.

It’s all change in the top 10, with blue tits in their highest position since the Big Garden Birdwatch began, at number two. The previous occupiers of the second spot, blackbirds, have dropped to number four.

Goldfinches have climbed another place since last year, and now perch at number seven. The robin, which has been as high as number seven in the past 10 years, has dropped back to number 10. And for the first time ever, the great spotted woodpecker has squeezed in at number 20.

Scientists believe that the weather has played a role in the ups and downs in this year’s top 10, as many of the birds were recorded in lower numbers in gardens due to the mild conditions.

Some species, such as blue tits, were likely to be more reliant on food provided in gardens than others, such as blackbirds, which could easily find their favoured foods like worms and insects in the countryside.

Just 10 years ago, goldfinches were in 14th position, but scientists believe that the increase in people providing food like nyjer seed and sunflower hearts in gardens, may have contributed to their steady rise to number seven.

Overall, numbers of species such as blackbirds, fieldfares and redwings may appear to have dropped in our gardens since last year. But in many cases this is not because these populations are in decline, but because these species don’t need to come into our gardens during mild winters due to there being plenty of natural food available in the wider countryside.

However the continuing declines of some species are of greater concern. Numbers of starlings and song thrushes have dropped by an alarming 84 and 81 per cent respectively since the Birdwatch began in 1979.

There is slightly better news for the house sparrow, as the declines appear to have slowed, and it remains the most commonly-seen bird in our gardens. However, it remains on the red list as we have still lost 62 per cent since 1979.

Richard Bashford, Big Garden Birdwatch organiser, says: “2014 was always going to be an interesting Big Garden Birdwatch as the winter has been so mild, and we wondered if it would have a significant impact on garden birds.

“They were out and about in the wider countryside finding natural food instead of taking up our hospitality. The good news is that this may mean we have more birds in our gardens in the coming months because more survived the mild winter.”

 

The Big Green Bike Ride 2014

Image

Pic: Friends of the Earth

This year’s Big Green Bike Ride looks like being the biggest ever and it’s such a great way to raise funds for Friends of the Earth.

Overall there will be 120 miles of cycling, but you can pick the challenge that suits you. This year’s ride starts on Saturday, 17 May, and the 85 mile route will take you from the hustle and bustle of London, through the country lanes of Surrey and Hampshire, to the New Forest.

The next day will be a much shorter 35 mile ride, spent exploring the heather-covered heath, farmland, ancient woodland and mudflats of this beautiful corner of the countryside. You can take part in both days or choose just one of these challenges. All riders will receive a goody bag and there will be an evening of food and entertainment in the heart of the New Forest.

group_of_cyclists_smiling_400