Category Archives: Nature

Tips for a Green New Year

It’s far from comprehensive, but here’s a link to some New Year’s tips for lightening our footprint on our precious planet:

Tips for a Green New Year | Easy Ideas for Organizing and Cleaning Your Home | HGTV.Happy-New-Year-2015-Beautiful-Green

Merry Christmas

Sunday Photo Magazine — 11/30/2014

PLANET EARTH NEWSLETTER blog

PLANET EARTH WILDLIFE AND NATURE (INVITE ONLY)
1,999 members
Baumela notte
PLANET EARTH WEATHER
455 members
sɪˈrɛnɪti,stɔːm & stɑːs
PLANET EARTH ANIMALS/BIRDS
2,557 members
Le rouge gorge
PLANET EARTH OUR HOME
8,044 members
Hawfinch
PLANET EARTH FLOWERS
1,516 members
orchidée tachetée
PLANET EARTH SUNRISE SUNSETS
3,541 members
Picture of the Day #133 - What a beautiful Composition
PLANET EARTH REFLECTIONS
1,684 members
Dead Horse Ranch on a cloudy morn
PLANET EARTH LANDSCAPES
1,859 members
Thames river Ontario
PLANET EARTH ARCHITECTURE
3,130 members
Smoke break silhouette  - Paris
PLANET EARTH MACRO WORLD
765 members
Willow Tip
PLANET EARTH BUTTERFLIES, BEES, BUGS, AND INSECTS
2,712 members
Shag-carpet caterpillar, Tarchon felderi
PLANET EARTH URBAN LANDSCAPES
603 members
Madrid is cool but hot (II)
PLANET EARTH IN BLACK AND WHITE
1,769 members
Manhattan Bridge, N.Y.c
PLANET EARTH TRANSPORTATION
1,489 members
2014-10-23  - 558 - Lg. Vitorino Damásio
PLANET EARTH MOUNTAINS
397 members
喀那斯的金色時光
PLANET EARTH VINTAGE ARCHITECTURE
326 members
Gitter vor dem Westchor
PLANET EARTH CAUTION, DANGER, AND WARNING SIGNS
409 members
GIVE US A BRAKE Slow Down!
PLANET EARTH TRAINS AND RAILROADS
474 members
RD10614.  46233 at Euston.
PLANET EARTH UNDERWATER
898 members
Jellyfish, Smögen
PLANET EARTH BACK IN THE DAY
729 members
Gran Canaria , In Agüimes unterwegs , 3-7/1934
PLANET EARTH IN PANORAMA
882 members
V&A Waterfront Panorama
PLANET EARTH FIELD GUIDE TO AMERICAN ARCHITECTURE
240 members
Building
PLANET EARTH IN SILHOUETTES
908 members
Untitled
PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD

View original post 38 more words

‘Divide and rule’—raven politics

World of Birds

 Cognitive biologists now revealed that ravens use a "divide and rule" strategy in dealing with the bonds of conspecifics. Credit: Jorg Massen Cognitive biologists now revealed that ravens use a “divide and rule” strategy in dealing with the bonds of conspecifics. Credit: Jorg Massen

Mythology has attributed many supernatural features to ravens. Studies on the cognitive abilities of ravens have indeed revealed that they are exceptionally intelligent. Ravens live in complex social groups and they can gain power by building social bonds that function as alliances. Cognitive biologists of the University of Vienna now revealed that ravens use a ‘divide and rule’ strategy in dealing with the bonds of conspecifics: Socially well integrated ravens prevent others from building new alliances by breaking up their bonding attempts.

Thomas Bugnyar and his team have been studying the behavior of approximately 300 wild ravens in the Northern Austrian Alps for years. They observed that ravens slowly build alliances through affiliative interactions such as grooming and playing. However, they also observed that these affiliative interactions were…

View original post 226 more words

Eurobirdwatch 2014 sees 2.5 million migrating birds

Dear Kitty. Some blog

This video is about bird migration.

From BirdLife:

Eurobirdwatch 2014 sees 2.5 million migrants in the air

By Elodie Cantaloube, Mon, 20/10/2014 – 08:18

On the weekend 4–5 October, over 23,000 people took part in the most exciting nature event of the autumn: the annual Eurobirdwatch. From Portugal to Kazakhstan, from Malta to Norway, BirdLife Partners invited people of all ages to discover and observe the fascinating migration of birds. The result of these two days of fun, exchange and learning was the observation of over 2.5 million birds as they migrated to southern countries in search of suitable wintering grounds.

In autumn, some species of birds, the so-called migratory birds, leave the north, where they breed in spring and summer and head to their wintering grounds in the south. The migration of several thousands of birds of different species is a unique spectacle; the BirdLife…

View original post 226 more words

An epic story: Very Important Trees.

Woodland Matters

Nearly 1,000 years ago, the epic story of the build up to and successful invasion of Britain by William the Conqueror was captured on a length of embroidered cloth. There is much that we don’t know about this iconic piece of work, including who commissioned it. But looking closer, the Bayeux tapestry tells us much about trees.

I was recently invited to the heart of Normandy to give a presentation to the University of Paris, Summer School in Collonges about the iconography of the trees on the Bayeux tapestry.

According to Sylvette Lemagnen, one of the conservators of the tapestry,

“The Bayeux tapestry is one of the supreme achievements of the Norman Romanesque … Its survival almost intact over nine centuries is little short of miraculous … Its exceptional length, the harmony and freshness of its colours, its exquisite workmanship, and the genius of its guiding spirit combine to make it endlessly fascinating.”

View original post 619 more words

Global wildlife halved in 40 years, reveals WWF

lion_1_19451

Pic: WWF

Global wildlife populations have halved in just 40 years, according to new research by scientists at the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and the Zoological Society of London (ZSL).

Creatures across land, rivers and the seas are being decimated as humans kill them for food in unsustainable numbers, while polluting or destroying their habitats, the WWF’s Living Planet Report 2014 found.

The key findings are:

  • Populations of mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and fish have declined by an average of 52% since the 1970s.
  • Freshwater species populations have suffered a 76% decline, an average loss almost double that of land and marine species.
  • The worst declines have been observed in the Tropics.

The report draws upon the Living Planet Index, a database maintained by the Zoological Society of London, which monitors trends in over 10,000 populations of 3038 species since the 1970s. It also looks at how human consumption levels have increased in the same time period. It shows that the biggest recorded threat to biodiversity comes from the combined impacts of habitat loss and degradation, driven by unsustainable human consumption.

“If half the animals died in London zoo next week it would be front page news,” said Professor Ken Norris, ZSL’s director of science. “But that is happening in the great outdoors. This damage is not inevitable but a consequence of the way we choose to live.” He said nature, which provides food and clean water and air, was essential for human wellbeing.

“We have lost one half of the animal population and knowing this is driven by human consumption, this is clearly a call to arms and we must act now,” said Mike Barratt, director of science and policy at WWF. He said more of the Earth must be protected from development and deforestation, while food and energy had to be produced sustainably.